100 Minds

Aus der ganzen Welt

John Maeda

President,
Rhode Island School of Design

Providence, United States

We think having Google at our disposal has changed how we think about knowledge retention, but imagine when that knowledge is literally integrated into your being.

In 2112, creativity will be the most valued form of work because creativity is about going against what everyone (including yourself) believes in. By 2112, our minds will be directly connected to computers. We think having Google at our disposal has changed how we think about knowledge retention, but imagine when that knowledge is literally integrated into your being. We will all know all that we need to know, together, by being interconnected with all the information of the world. The answers won’t be at our fingertips, they will be within us. And so goes any room for debate.

What will be at a premium in this new world? What will enable us to retain our unique stamp of humanity? Our unique ability to create ideas and concepts that go against the all-powerful norm of the factual. The ways of thinking and working that artists and designers embody so naturally will be in higher demand. They are the ones who are used to flying in the face of reality, of suspending disbelief to come up with what is next. These skills will be universally recognized as how we advance society’s future, rather than a nice “add-on” as they are perceived of today. Creativity will be the new currency of work, the world over.

John Maeda Bio:

John Maeda is a world-renowned artist, graphic designer, computer scientist and educator whose career reflects his philosophy of humanizing technology. For over a decade, he has worked to integrate technology, education and the arts into a 21st-century synthesis of creativity and innovation. A recipient of the National Design Award and represented in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, Maeda became president of Rhode Island School of Design in June 2008.

He seeks to connect RISD to political, economic, social, and business spheres where artists and designers make a difference, and has prioritized scholarships to ensure the broadest possible access to a RISD education.

Maeda taught media arts and sciences at MIT for 12 years and served as associate director of research at MIT Media Lab. His books include The Laws of Simplicity, translated into 14 languages. Redesigning Leadership (2011, with Becky Bermont) expands on his Twitter posts. In 2008, Maeda was named one of the 75 most influential people of the 21st century by Esquire and in 2010 he was called the “Steve Jobs of academia” by Forbes.