100 Mentes

De todo el mundo

Carl Levin

Senator,
U.S. Senate

Detroit, United States

Hard work, perseverance and creativity will play a key role in success – and Michigan’s workforce and innovative companies will continue to lead the way in the century to come.

The one thing we know for sure about work in the next 100 years is that we really can’t know what we will see – the truth is likely to be more fantastic than anything we could conjure in our minds. A century ago, who could have imagined the world we work and live in today?
But we can guess a few things. If the last century is any indication, knowledge and skill will continue to be more important, which means we must invest in education and lifelong learning to make sure our workers remain the best in the world. We can guess that technology will continue to drive commerce, which means investments in science and research will grow in importance. And we can guess that hard work, perseverance and creativity will play a key role in success – and that means Michigan’s great workforce and innovative companies will continue to lead the way in the century to come.

Carl Levin Bio:

From the first piece of legislation he introduced as a U.S. senator – a bill to end discrimination by credit card companies – Carl Levin has spoken up for working families, held powerful institutions accountable and worked to build an America that lives up to the ideals of its founders. He has become one of the nation’s most respected leaders on national security, a powerful voice for equality and justice, and a fighter for economic fairness.

After graduating from Detroit Central High School, Swarthmore College, and Harvard Law School, he was named assistant attorney general and general counsel of Michigan Civil Rights Commission, 1964; elected to Detroit City Council, 1969; elected to U.S. Senate, 1978; re-elected in 1984, 1990, 1996, 2002 and 2008.

In the Senate, his top priority has been the economic well-being of Michigan families. He has been a consistent voice for support of American manufacturing, the backbone of Michigan’s economy and the nation’s. Since joining the Senate, he has been a member the Armed Services Committee. From 2001 to 2003 and again from 2005 to the present, he has been the committee’s chairman.

His awards and honors include: one of TIME’s 10 best senators, 2006; Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Foundation’s Four Freedoms Medal, 2007; Global Service Award, World Affairs Council, 2007; Secretary of the Navy Distinguished Public Service Award, 2003; National Guard Association of the U.S. Harry S. Truman Award, 2004; National Marine Sanctuary Stewardship Award, 2005.

He married Barbara Halpern in 1961. They raised three daughters, Kate, Laura and Erica, and they spend as much time as they can with their six grandchildren.