100 Mentes

De todo el mundo

Greg Tran

Architectural Designer, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Columbus, United States

As it escapes the screen, the potential of the digital enters into the realm of architecture and an entirely different wealth of knowledge.

100 dreams | 100 minds | 100 years

The past is our greatest tool for understanding the future and the cyclical nature of art and technology define a foundation for every generation to build upon. Being aware of that foundation is the first step.

In antiquity there were three forms of material art: People looked at painting, walked around sculpture and walked through architecture. With the contemporary digital equivalent, “augmented reality” functions merely as sculpture. We move around an AR object, but it isn’t embedded within the physical environment. Although popular technologies like the Wii, 3DS and Microsoft Kinect have begun to engage physical spaces, the trajectory of this research is evolving from a linear history of digital ideation. The work is compelling, but it overlooks an essential part of the equation. As it escapes the screen, the potential of the digital enters into the realm of architecture and an entirely different wealth of knowledge.

While current digital 2d content is subject to the format, size and shape of our screens, digital 3d content will conform to the canvas of our homes, workplaces and cities. The radical and natural disparity of this canvas will necessitate localized solutions and a new paradigm for digital matter. The history of the digital has been characterized by ubiquity but this evolution will draw strength from personal subjectivity and inherent variation.

As the future unfurls, the combination of AR and architecture is not only a possibility, but also an inevitability.  It is not simply about the realization of the technology; it’s about the development and the foresight to design it well.

Greg Tran Bio:

Greg Tran is an architectural designer/filmmaker who was born and raised in Columbus, Ohio. He won the Thesis Prize at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and has created a comprehensive framework for the future of architecture and digital interaction.

By leveraging innovations in technology, media and music, he seeks to create new audiences for architecture and empower the discipline as a whole. His work blends the surreal with the practical and focuses on undiscovered potentials for buildings and human experience.